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New Player Experience Suggestions

Right, by any measure I'm still a green bean. Today there was a poster who did not have a good first experience and took to Reddit to complain.

I wanted to give some ideas/suggestions as general feedback from someone who just went through the game for the first time.

1) Archetypes should indicate a degree of difficulty to them

Some archetypes are going to be harder because of skills and stats than others. Whether it's because you don't have the skills you need, or can't get the equipment to do what you want, giving an indication on the degree of starting difficulty might be a really good idea.

2) Setting Player Expectations/Goals

There were two example in OOC that were really good. People make a decker expecting to be Neo, or want to be a gun toting Pistolero and can't out of the gate. There's nothing wrong with not being able to do those things, other than the expectation of making an archetype is that you are going to be that kind of person. The suggestion I got was that by making a character to an archetype I'd be able to actually do those kinds of activities. I think it would be great to in addition to the degree of difficulty have some beginning, middle and end game goals/expectations. They can be generic, but would help square expectations on what you might be doing to start. Giving people some goals to shoot for lets them know that this is a possibility in the game and they also know they kind of gameplay they should shoot for. That's not to say they have to do those things, but for people who have no idea what's going on (like me) Something like: Beginning - Find a gang, identify leaders, get in good with them. Middle - Protect your turf, participate in gang activities. End - Become a leader in your gang.

3) Perhaps giving people an idea that there are individuals who's job it is to help immies.

The basic premise I got when starting was trust no one. Additionally, the first person to help me apparently had a bad reputation on SIC and I was told not to trust that person. My first week I spent trying to figure out which people I should take advice from and who I shouldn't. FOIC has a whole new meaning when you get told things that don't square up to what you see in game. Being new, you don't have the experience to know that some people are supposed to help you and I ignored some advice I should have taken just because I had no idea who I should trust or not.

4) Be really careful on OOC chat when talking about what people should know or not know.

One of the comments when talking on the Reddit thread was that "if you can't do X in the first 10 minutes you're a moron." I knew that wasn't directed to me, but I'm still not sure how I would do X in the first 10 minutes :( Thankfully, I know the voice and know they're a fun person and we chatted about it. Had I been in my first few days I might have come away with a very different opinion. Things which are obvious to you because you've played a while might not be to someone else, especially someone new who is trying to read and absorb everything.

The last part is something I'm not totally sure of because I don't have the experience to judge it, but just feels wrong to me.

There is a way to make money in Red that can be done much easier once you figure out how. (I don't know what I can say IC/OOC here). So the good is that I could make some progress once I figured that out. The bad is that I missed out on the stress/excitement/challenge of having to 'scrounge' to make that progress. It's kind of like the ease of doing things one way was taking me away from the elements that would get me more involved in the challenge and RP in the Mix. I don't know if it's good or bad, by design or not, but I'm sure I'm not the first to notice. As a character, the thought was... "I'm going to go do that thing that rarely works out... why?"

But by me (and others) doing things the easy way, that probably removed some RP opportunities that other players in the Mix might have had (either by helping or hurting). So what's my point here? I guess I feel there should be either more reward for doing it the hard way, or more risk/consequences for doing it the easy way. Like the people in the Mix are far more grateful they get some basic commerce done while other people have alternatives and do this because it's cheap and easy.

Summary:

Love the game, love the dedication of the players and GMs who make it so cool. Just giving some suggestions from what I saw on how to perhaps address some of the things I found difficult as well as what the OP on reddit said.

"1) Archetypes should indicate a degree of difficulty to them

Some archetypes are going to be harder because of skills and stats than others. Whether it's because you don't have the skills you need, or can't get the equipment to do what you want, giving an indication on the degree of starting difficulty might be a really good idea."

For this, I've got some holdbacks. Adding a 'difficulty level' to things could lead new players in a herd toward the percieved/ranked 'easiest class'. I do agree it could be useful, but we must also weigh the possible outcomes doing so could bring. I think we would want players to branch out, be unique in their own way than subconsciously drift toward one solitary thing and overpopulate it.

What are your thoughts on this?

Why not just List some difficulties and draw backs to each archetype? Like, Don't classify which is easy and which is hard, just point out a few difficulties and let them decide which is too hard or too easy compared their desired playstyle.
I'm entirely against the difficulty listings of archetypes, and think it's something that should be learned through experiencing the game. Not because FOIC (But also because FOIC), but because archetypes are guidelines at best.

For instance, a Fixer could also be pretty sweet at decking. A Street Sam might know their way around trading.

Sticking to an Archetype, and not putting a unique spin on it with your own experiences and character adaptation is in my opinion fairly bland.

Point made, I'd dislike that too, honestly. I personally really liked that I could just ignore the archetypes and do whatever I wanted right out of the gate, even if it crippled my character in some meta way, cause It opens up things in an IC way..This game is pretty perfect for what I came to it for.
Thinking outside of what's meta, for what's IC and themely, and fits your char is half the fun of Sindome to be fair. It's how I've always done it in my two and a half years here, and will always do it, even if it's not optimal.

If a char does something enough, they should start to develop skill in that area, and in that regard you, as the player, should pump UE into things related to that. Seriously, if you haven't done this before (Which I 100% hope you have), try it. It makes for some weird, but more fun stuff appearing.

I agree, but this is advice for new players who you want to have a decent experience. I fully expect to get permed soon for something I didn't get. That's cool. I'll start again knowing better. But I was frustrated when I realized that I couldn't do anything on what I signed up to do. The person on Reddit didn't bother to continue. That's a perception problem which doesn't matter for an experienced player but does for someone you may want to cultivate and learn.

Maybe it's a weeding out thing. But, I think it would make it far more new player friendly. It's no different than the knowledge I will have when I am forced to make a new character. If I want to do X, it'll be a little harder at the start. If I want to do Y, it won't.

To your point, the archetypes already exist and give skill/stat suggestions. I'm not sure how letting people know a degree of starting difficulty changes what skills they might take at the start. That still will be influenced by the recommendations that already exist.

I have only one true bit of advice for newbies, and it's the advice I gave myself when I first started playing:

Play the game. It's gonna deal you bum hands, kick your ass, teach you that it isn't a fair game. But, when that diamond plot, that good RP session, that first kill, or first good death. Those moments of ass clench that reminds you that this theme is out to get you just as much as you're out to get it hits. You'll be golden.

Live on the adrenaline of your latest sleazy scam. If it fucks up? Don't be disheartened, approach it from a different angle. You die? Oh well, shit happens. You perm? Yay, you get to try your next cool char idea.

Keep a backup idea ready for chars, we never know when we'll perm. Keep a backup idea for your backup idea.

Don't follow what you think is meta, it either isn't, or it's not fun. RP first, UE second.

Be Cyberpunk, and walk safe.

The main thing that stands out to me as a new player, and that separates Sindome from other RPGs that I have played over the last 30 years is the starting 'power level' of new characters.

There should be a way to communicate to new players that more than anything else, your character is just a person. They are in no way exceptional. They are not going to "come out of chargen" being particularly good at anything. In fact, they are likely going to suck at everything. And on top of that, they are not going to have any "gear". They are going to have to find a way to make money and work up to the gear.

That is what sets Sindome apart. In every other game I have ever played, you choose an archtype or class or role or whatever the system calls it. You get a bit of starting resources to purchase some generic and/or class specific gear. You then team up with others who are new, and Hi Ho, Hi Ho, Adventuring You Go.

I would almost classify Sindome as the RPG equivalent of those FPS survival games that have been fairly popular in the last year or two.

It is important to strip away any expectation that new players might have about what Sindome "is" or what it "should be" or what it "can be".

Having said that, it would be helpful to provide more feedback than "FOIC" to questions that aren't cut and dried xgame / command help questions. I don't know how to communicate what I'm thinking without crossing boundaries here, so if this gets into IC territory, please feel free to delete this post.

But something along the lines of, "As you develop your character's stats and abilities, the game world will 'open up' for you. You will see more in the world around you. You will be able to do more with objects in the game. etc."

Something that dangles the carrot out there, that promises more depth and encourages people to stick around because they are engaged with and interested in experiencing more of the world as they develop their character.

As I was driving in this morning I was thinking about this and also some things that my character is trying to do.

Ryuzaki, I really like what you say in your post. Yes, that should be good advice for anyone. Learn, make mistakes, RP failure, live the journey, and have fun with it.

However, there is a difference in mechanics and RP. I think my biggest issue when I started is that the mechanics of the game did not fit what I thought was going to be my RP. I was asked to look at archetypes, I chose one, and my play experience was nothing like what I had chosen.

For me, I had enough fun that it didn't matter. I met some brilliant people who showed me the promise of the game (staff and players). For some, they just shrug and walk away, or complain on Reddit... I guess all I'm saying is that for a first time player, there is an expectation that you are going to do one thing, and then when you play, that may not be even close to what you are going to do.

Personally, I don't see how a lack of basic information enhances anything for a new player. Unless the intent is to weed out people who have a propensity to leave quickly, then it makes more sense. However, I would think if you want to cultivate new people and grow more; then letting people have a better expectation on what is going to happen for their FIRST experience with both the community and the game might be a good idea.

This is not game breaking knowledge, it's something that anyone who plays for a couple weeks can figure out. "I'm going to start again with someone whose skills and gear won't be readily useful for a while, check, I'm in for the long haul!" So if is okay for people playing their second or third character to have this knowledge, why is it not okay to give it to a player who you want to have a good FIRST experience?

While I am a programmer by trade, I have frequent contact with sales. One of the salespeople's sayings, and it's very true. It doesn't matter if you are saying something good or bad to the customer, just that you set expectations on what you are going to do moving forward. People feel upset if they expect Chocolate Pudding and get Weetabix. For the OP of the Reddit thread, they felt strongly enough to leave, maybe good, maybe they would have been a brilliant asset moving forward if they got a chance to experience more.

"This then leads to established chars investing less in immigrants since a significant number of them just up and off themselves at the faintest glance since they're disposable characters to begin with, which stalls plots and further plays into Sindome's clique feedback loop which ultimately results in the game being extremely difficult to actually breach into.

People need to come out of the gate with at least basic tools and some very, VERY rudimentary knowledge on how to use their skills."

I could not agree more Ephemeralis. New players have very little reason to stick to a character if their character is not as powerful/skilled as they initially perceived, whatever the reason for that may be.

I think a balance should be found between what is IC information and should be FOIC and what is important, basic information on game mechanics and the way progress works in Sindome.

So far, I would argue it is really close to being perfect. However, I remember when I first made a character and wanted to make a cool Street Samurai, only to find out that I would basically just be a weak, naked, clueless immigrant with no way to backup my IC experience as a samurai.

I guess what I'm getting at is that the lack of information on archetypes harms RP for new players. This makes it difficult for them to see a reason to even give the game a chance past chargen, resulting in fewer players or frustration for new players trying to learn via game-help.

Real life doesn't come with a guide and neither does SD and if it did have a guide, you would have to find it IC. Why? It fuels RP. This is a role-playing game, but I see a lot of players (both old and new) focusing more in the game parts and not so much in the RP parts.

They get obsessed with mechanics, because they just want to win. They think they will find a cookie cutter foolproof recipe that will guarantee them success. Which ends up being counterproductive really. These kinds of people don't get it.

The truth is that RP trumps mechanics, players are only as strong as their RP. I've seen new players accomplish with RP in 3 weeks more than others in 3 years.

Learn the genera and the themes, try to understand how the world works and use that to embody the characterization of your game person through RP. This is a cyberpunk game, you need to become a cyberpunk.

There is no real blueprint, you are given the freedom to make your own path.

Honestly SD has never been that kind of game, if the staff wants to change that in the future its up to them. Would having OOC guides make the game more popular? No doubt. Would it make the game more boring? Absolutely.

If you had unrealistic expectations about what your character was going to be off the gates, then you didn't bother to read carefully the newbie guide and help files, because right there it tells you that you aren't going to be a badass. Maybe the language should be changed to make it even more bluntly clear.

The truth is that new characters are pretty much blank slates, its up to each and every player to decide and work on what that character evolves into. So maybe, take some responsibility for it?

Every single player has had to struggle, its part of the game and its part of the theme. The people who make it aren't special snowflakes, they just put in the work and just like anything that is worth a damn, it takes a little bit of time to learn it.

It took me about 6 months of struggling and killing off my characters because I realized they were improperly built for the type of RP I wanted to partake in.

That doesn't seem conducive to a lively, roleplaying playerbase. Why should you have to struggle with the IC dangers of Sindome, only to find out that your ex-wrestler character is actually complete dogshit at doing any sort of wrestling? Why does it have to be this extreme level of trial-and-error that results in constant character suicide?

I mean, imagine having a meaningful RP session with a character, only to find out they randomly killed themselves for no apparent reason? It's not only removing that character from the experience of Sindome, but its also removing other players from their immersion.

It makes MORE sense to reveal more about the game, not less.

Watch your tone, Ephemeralis.
Like I said, some people just don't get it.

Ephemeralis if all you got from my posting was tripe shit then you clearly lack comprehensive reading skills which is a big disadvantage when it comes to text games such as this one.

Its tough to help the newbies when they don't even bother to actually read.

Maybe you should stick to d20, it seems more your speed.

Please make sure to read 'help bleed' and enjoy your struggles.

I can sort of understand where the OP is coming from as a newish player.

I was pretty annoyed when I learned the archetype I picked out of chargen had very bad career prospects just a few weeks after coming onto the grid, and almost a year later I have used none of the skills I spent my initial UE on.

What kept me playing was my attachment to the RP and the desire to try new things, eventually I found out what I really wanted to do after getting a lot of advice IC.

This then leads to established chars investing less in immigrants since a significant number of them just up and off themselves at the faintest glance since they're disposable characters to begin with, which stalls plots and further plays into Sindome's clique feedback loop which ultimately results in the game being extremely difficult to actually breach into.

People need to come out of the gate with at least basic tools and some very, VERY rudimentary knowledge on how to use their skills.

This actually does have merit.

They get obsessed with mechanics, because they just want to win. They think they will find a cookie cutter foolproof recipe that will guarantee them success. Which ends up being counterproductive really.

This too, has merit, but is honestly unavoidable.

I think there may be a disconnect when it comes to how Sindome worked and ran with a 10-20 player playerbase and how Sindome is/is going to run with the large playerbase it currently has. I also think there is probably a disconnect with people who hold long time staff positions and players. No, that was not an insult or a jab at any staff member.

I appreciate all the feedback, even things that tell me I'm wrong. Thank you.

"Real life doesn't come with a guide and neither does SD and if it did have a guide, you would have to find it IC. Why? It fuels RP. This is a role-playing game, but I see a lot of players (both old and new) focusing more in the game parts and not so much in the RP parts."

But you are not starting out as a blank slate. Characters in this game are already starting having some background. We have history and have at least done something with the X years of our lives. If my history said that I was previously a gunfighter, then my character should have some idea of what it takes to be a gunfighter.

New players don't get this information. As a player, I don't know what skills, stats, equipment or things that I would need to do to make my gunfighter work in Withmore. If we are modeling RL, my character shouldn't need to ask that information, at least the basics of it. My character has nominally done this already and should have some idea on what they need to do it.

"They get obsessed with mechanics, because they just want to win. They think they will find a cookie cutter foolproof recipe that will guarantee them success. Which ends up being counterproductive really. These kinds of people don't get it."

I might cop to the first, but that's because what I chose seems very obtuse and I still have done little with my chose archetype even trying to get into it very religiously. I'm getting closer, but I'm not trying to win anything. What I did want, was to have a story about a character who was an archetype. I'll get there, but as my first experience, that has been rough.

"Learn the genera and the themes, try to understand how the world works and use that to embody the characterization of your game person through RP. This is a cyberpunk game, you need to become a cyberpunk.

There is no real blueprint, you are given the freedom to make your own path."

Then perhaps the issue is even suggesting archetypes. As I mentioned, there are expectations. If you tell me that I am building a Medic, I kind of expect to do medicy things. If I'm a decker, then I expect to do computery things. That's not to say I expect to win or be the best, but those ARE cyberpunk themes and I sort of expected I'd get to do them in a cyberpunk game. Now I realize that I will be able to do them in time... but what I ended up was nothing like the Cyberpunk archetype I chose. So why did I chose an archetype at all?

I think as a new player experience it would have nearly been better to say. Do you want to be Brainy, Strong, Quick...etc. Then a explanation that you shouldn't expect to really be anything out of the gate and that you will form what you are over weeks and months of play and RP. Now the expectation I have matches what I get when first sign in and play the game.

"If you had unrealistic expectations about what your character was going to be off the gates, then you didn't bother to read carefully the newbie guide and help files, because right there it tells you that you aren't going to be a badass. Maybe the language should be changed to make it even more bluntly clear"

There is a very BIG difference in not being a badass and not being able to do anything related to your archetype. Again, if I'm choosing and reading about an archetype I kind of expect to have RP and gameplay reflecting that. I did read the newbie guide and did not have any illusion as to being "powerful" or a "badass". I made my history so that my character was new, young and inexperienced. I put in cues as to why they might be so. Even so, it was a big shock as to what I ended up for the first few weeks.

The truth is that new characters are pretty much blank slates, its up to each and every player to decide and work on what that character evolves into. So maybe, take some responsibility for it?

I kind of think that this is disingenuous. I agree on the blank slate, but we're not telling people they are going to be a blank slate. You are telling them to choose between a number of archetypes and letting them assign skills and stats. That's not a blank slate.

If it is okay for people to create a character with knowledge gained from playing for some time, then why is it not okay to give some of that basic information to new players?

Every single player has had to struggle, its part of the game and its part of the theme. The people who make it aren't special snowflakes, they just put in the work and just like anything that is worth a damn, it takes a little bit of time to learn it.

I don't think that's part of the Cyberpunk theme at all. No where in any Cyberpunk novel or story that I have ever seen was a person so completely unaware of who or what they could do. It's not theme to roll a Decker and have no idea how to use a computer. Or it's not theme to roll a Medic and not know the first bits on medicine. Those are game choices IC/OOC barrier choices, mechanics choices... not theme choices. You are not less Cyberpunk because you let people know that playing one archetype or another might be harder for your first playthrough.

All I was asking was a little more information to be considered for NEW players. Again, this is not secret sauce. If I play for 2-3 weeks and booth to make a new character, no one is worried that I now know that some archetypes are going to challenging out of the gate. No on is worried that I know how to open a door and probably won't RP asking that. No one is upset that I have a better idea on how to make my vision come true.

My thought is that you might have better player retention and acceptance by better aligning the expectations to the actual experience.

The reason you choose an archetype is so you eventually get to the point where you can do those things. Without sticking to it you're wasting UE and will never get there.
Agreed. But my suggestion is giving a little more OOC info on the challenge and difficulty of starting an archetype.

Also, letting people have some idea on what gameplay might be like early and late for that archetype. That way they have an idea on what they might be up against and can choose something that might interest them more. They stick around and hopefully see the really cool bits of the game.

Yeah, your feedback is great, thank you for sharing it :) Just dropped in to answer that question.
I do think revisiting the archetypes, if for nothing more than to flesh out or redescribe some of them might be very warranting to ease the expectations vs. frustration gap, both for incoming new players and players who are currently or have investing large amounts of time and UE into specific archetypes. There are job titles / paths / actions described at times in them that are grossly misleading (looking at you, decking archetype).

I think ideas that have been mentioned for giving more specific examples of what you might do in a given archetype at earlier / mid / later times in your character's age are excellent. As someone else said somewhere, it's all about expectations.

I don't think Ephemeralis' ideas about giving new players a few more sprinklings of IC direcition related to their possible archetype are terrible or completely ruin our golden FOIC directive. We already tell immigrants coming in not to fuck with gangers, like seriously don't do it (instead of letting them FOIC). Though I think most skills are self-explanatory, others are definitely not for our game mechanics, and giving someone a nudge on maybe what their electro_tech or systems skill might give them a general value to someone else for, if they stick around and RP etc., wouldn't be the worst thing. Literally adding a few words here and there to the help (skill) files could be huge, IDK.

Any kind of 'starting equipment' doesn't work bc cyberpunk and people would just farm immigrants for stuff.

Archetypes aren't classes that you need to fill and money does not equal progress. You play the game where you're at and maybe work toward more but that isn't because there's a better or worse, or any kind of a win state. You're trying to tell a story, not autistically accumulate points.
I agree with that too. However, when I came here, I was pointed at archetypes. I read them and made a character based on what I read.

I guess to summarize:

If you want the game to be blank slate make your own story, then tell people you startwith nothing, give them no starting skills/stats. That's blank slate and my expectations are that I know nothing and won't expect to be anyone.

If you introduce people toarchetyes and have them make history, assign stats and skills, then they aren't a blank slate. I'm something. Maybe not good, but I'm starting as something or an idea of something. For a new player that's where the disconnect occurs. Even then, you often are not that something and likely won't for a while. Giving information that this is the case helps the person know what to expect.

That stuff is all covered extensively in the help files and tutorial videos.
Just a few thoughts I've had as I read over this thread.

First, it is hard to say that Archetype A as hard and Archetype B is easy. Even if everyone used the archetypes exactly as presented (I doubt many do), each player is different. Some might find the social aspect of playing a fixer a nightmare while others would thrive with it. Some might find the fast paced commands needed for combat and rushed escapes overwhelming while others might excel it it and love it.

Second is that I disagree to a large extent that everyone coming out of character gen is a blank slate and of little use. Sure, if you compare them to a 2.5 year old character they are negligible in a direct stat/skill rolloff. But they are perfectly capable when compared to other characters of their level (I hate to use this term). It's why so many try and hand off easy jobs to other less capable characters as they rise in power.

I personally feel that every character you create should be a character you could see yourself happily playing for a long span. Yes, while you might unintentionally invest in a skill/stat you did not really want/need and didn't know it until later but that will be made less consequential in time. Eventually, once you feel that your character is pretty much set build wise, you can respec and recoup those 'lost UE points'. This will, of course be far down the road but it won't be a net loss in the long run and is really just a small setback in the beginning. Instead simply be prepared for the loss of a character and be ready to rock that next fun idea that you might have.

While I do think Sindome could improve on what info they present to new players I think that this will never really result in the level of impact we might think. A lot of players do not read the help files we already provide. Those who do are likely to have far smoother starts in Sindome. Again, not saying that we can't improve help files and @newbie and what info we present to player but we can't make them read all that.

Seems like there is a lot of hostility in this thread. I know this is an issue that touches close to home for just about everyone who has played the game, old and new. I think that is the case because everyone who has learned the game, did it within the existing system, and that's a bit of a badge of accomplishment. Sindome isn't an easy game to learn.

The badge of accomplishment. Everyone who has been playing, has it. But the truth is, the new player experience today is vastly different than it was 5 years ago. Part of the reason for that is we are always looking to improve.

There was a recent post that I had to delete where someone shared a bunch of OOC info THEY thought new players should have. Whatever their intention, they revealed things we do not want players knowing (how much UE it takes to hit the curve, for example) because it allows people to GAME the system before they UNDERSTAND the game. No one needs to roll out of chargen min-maxing on their first character. No one should really roll out of chargen min-maxing in general because that means you're playing the wrong game.

Now, the post they shared had some GOOD info in it too. But it also made a claim that 'the admin refuse to improve the new player experience'. I am angered by this as I've made it one of my primary goals over the past few years to really improve this experience.

So I'm going to detail how I've done that, and what has changed, both for the record, and so everyone on this thread can see that not only do we take feedback seriously, but each and every one of you came into the game with a DIFFERENT newbie experience. An experience that takes a very complex and daunting and scary system/game/experience, and tries it's best to make it easier and streamlined, while still maintaining the core principles of the game (find things out in character, learn as you go, mystery, exploration, accomplishment, etc).

1. New Player Training Videos - 2013-Present

I've spent dozens if hours recording / editing / rerecording these, and they are VERY useful. They are also watched for more than 2400 minutes in the last 30 days, with 850ish views.

2. Help File Audit - 2018

Over the summer I revamped our help file system, and went through every single help file, bringing it in line with our current standards, clarifying, and adding 'see also' and 'last updated' dates. This was a massive project that took about 50-60 hours in total.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/help-file-audit--updating--290/

3. Chargen Updates - 2018

Based on feedback from the forums and bug reports and emails, I made chargen updates for messaging to increase clarity, I fixed bugs, and in general tweaked out things worked to make the process easier to understand.

See this post: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/character-generation-updates-291/

I have also requested feedback on this, multiple times, and attempted (as I always do) to incorporate this feedback in future improvements.

4. New Help Files & aliases - 2017/2018

There are several new help files ('help expectations' for example) and a ton of aliases for help files, I routinely review all failed 'help' requests and have code setup to show the top 'missing help files'. This allows us to create new help files or if people routinely type 'help clone' but the help file is 'cloning' I set up an alias/redirect so help clone rediredcts to help cloning. This process takes a lot of time, and some thought, so as to not confuse people or send people to the wrong file, but it's very helpful. I'd say 10-15 hours have been spent on adding new help files and aliases this year.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/new-in-game-help-topics-199/

5. Game Help Karma 2018

This is an example of feedback that we got that translated very specifically into new code and process changes to better support new players. This is a way of generating better and more supportive and friendly answers for new players, when they come to game-help. It can be tough, answering the same questions over and over. At least you can get some super useful internet karama with @good-answer.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/-karma-and--good-answer-302/

6. Archetype Images -- [2016-2018

We have been updating our archetype pages and images to better give folks an understanding of what they are getting into, visually.

7. Ingress Messaging Updates - 2018

More flavor, more info, more clarity.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/ingress-messaging-updates-292/

8. OOC Reminders from SYS-MSG - 2018

These reminders progressively provide information to new players as they need it. Things like '@newbie' and '@rules' and '@Nakeds' and much more.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/ooc-reminders-from-sys-msg-255/

9. @request-service - 2018

A way for players to request help when GMs are not available.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/-request-service-254/

10. @request-puppet - 2017

A way for players to request puppets when GMs are not available, instead of being told to just stand around and wait or come back later.

See https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/-request-puppet-227/

11. Disconnection Cooldown - 2017

It's really frustrating to DC and not realize you can be robbed right away. This protects folks from that, for a bit. Reduces frustration and issues with new players.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/disconnection-cooldown-248/

12. Newbies Must Enter - 2016

You used to be able to just wander into the badlands and plenty of people did, then never got to the city or found anyone to RP with and thus, quit.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/newbies-must-enter-210/

13. @check-help / @new-help - 2017

A tool for players to help us write new help files easily.

See: https://www.sindome.org/bgbb/game-discussion/new-game-features/-check-help----new-help-232/

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That's 13 distinct, major features, updates, etc, to the new player process from the past 2 years. And that doesn't cover everything. It's just what I could remember or find on the BGBB. Does this seem like a game that isn't interested in improving this experience? Or doesn't listen to feedback and take it to heart?

OP: Thank you for your feedback. It will be used to make the game better.

Everyone else: thank you for taking the time to post, and please remember that we DO want to improve this experience and constructive feedback is ALWAYS welcome.

Thanks Slither, I think I am pretty positive in my feedback and I really do appreciate what has been done. I also want to clarify that this is not criticism for lack of doing things or even demanding that what I'm asking be done. I've done the NEW new player experience once now and have enough handle that it won't be as bad next time. I still don't know what a curve is, or what max UE is or a hundred other things, but that's fine. I think you guys do a great job and make these suggestions so you may keep a player that didn't bump into the people in game that I did and struggled enough to quit before finding the gems.

On a side node, I know I sent this feedback in before, but the videos are really good and while they were labeled in char creation... I um... missed them and watched them after about 10 days in. Still they answered a lot of things I really didn't get.

Hmm. That's good feedback. Maybe I need to up the amount of times we remind new players of video tutorials
I would say yes. But maybe I'm less perceptive than some people. They were informative and you put the work in. A strong suggestion to exit the character creator and watch some of the videos if you haven't already would go a long way.